i-shapebeauty:

Using film, visual art, dance and poetry, A Different Mirror provides a platform for Women of Colour artists to explore the conflicts about how we see ourselves versus how we are seen.

The 3 day exhibition and educational activities confront these crucial questions about the systems or structures that shape our relationship to our bodies and its connection to our identities. It holds up a mirror to see and know ourselves differently.

Exhibition Public Opening Times:

Saturday 26th April 2014 10 am – 5pm

Sunday 27th April 2014 12 pm – 5pm

 Featuring works by: Indigo WilliamsLesley AsareSanaa HamidNasreen RajaSarina Leah MantleWasma MansourUchenna Dance, Patricia Kaersenhout, and Ng’endo MukiiAowen JinJanine ‘j*9′ FrancoisClare Eluka, and Emerzy Corbin.

Reflections: Art as a Tool for Healing

Saturday 26th of April 2014

6:30pm – 8:30pm £7.50 (early bird £6.50)

This artist seminar explores the ways in which art can be used to heal and empower ourselves and others. It offers insight into different artistic mediums and how these artists have used their practices for reclamation and transformation.

Featuring a performance by writer Yrsa Daley-Ward, talks by Indigo Williams (poet) and Lesley Asare (visual and performance artist) of I Shape Beauty, and a panel discussion featuring Sharmila ChauhanAowen JinVicki Igbokwe (Uchenna Dance) and Bola Agbaje.

Book your ticket here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/reflections-art-as-a-tool-for-healing-tickets-11083233249?ref=ebtnebtckt 

Photos by Rowena Gordon Photography

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the-treble:

willowpedia:

crazymolerat36:

ewitsmichelle:

not just followers, everyone.

same

I’m here if any of you need to talk<3

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aljazeeraamerica:

Nonconsensual sex: How colleges rebranded rape

Around 15 years ago, Brett Sokolow was touring universities and advising them on how to deal with sexual assault on their campuses. On these visits, he noticed something strange. The schools had policies about rape, and recognized that rape happened. But when it came down to it, schools just didn’t want to believe their own students actually rape.

“I trained hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of hearing boards, and listening to them get squeamish about it,” Sokolow said. “The hearing board would say, ‘We’re not willing to label this guy a rapist.’” 

Sokolow, the CEO of the consulting and law firm the National Center for Higher Education Risk Management, decided colleges needed another word. But on the issue of sexual violence, almost every word is loaded.

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